Paris Climate Agreement Us Withdrawal

Although this has been going on for a long time, there is still a sense of disappointment for many Americans who believe that climate change is the greatest global challenge and that the United States should oppose it. Several tech executives – including Google CEO Sundar Pichai, Microsoft president and legal director Brad Smith, Apple CEO Tim Cook, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and General Electric CEO Jeff Immelt – condemned the decision. [177] [178] Microsoft`s Satya Nadella stated that Microsoft believes that “climate change is an urgent issue that requires global action.” Google`s Sundar Pichai tweeted: “Disappointed with today`s decision. Google will continue to work hard for a cleaner and more prosperous future for all.¬†Facebook`s Mark Zuckerberg said: “The exit from the Paris climate agreement is bad for the environment, bad for the economy and threatening the future of our children. The main objective of the agreement is to keep the increase in the average global temperature at a level well below 2oC above pre-industrial levels, including by reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The agreement is different from the 1997 Kyoto Protocol, the last UNFCCC amendment, which was widely adopted, as no annex is established to reduce the liability of developing countries. On the contrary, emission targets have been negotiated separately for each nation and must be implemented voluntarily, so U.S. officials view the Paris agreement as an executive agreement rather than a legally binding agreement. This reversed the U.S. Congress` commitment to ratify the agreement. [20] In April 2016, the United States signed the Paris Agreement and adopted it by executive order in September 2016. President Obama forced the United States to pay $3 billion for the Green Climate Fund.

[21] The Fund has set a goal of raising $100 billion per year by 2020. In June 2017, Mr. Trump held a press conference in the White House Rose Garden promising to withdraw from the agreement and said he was unfair to the United States, which would leave the agreement and then begin negotiations on readmission or a new agreement “on a level playing field for the United States.” In April 2017, a group of 20 MPs from the Right-wing Alternative for Germany, the UK Independence Party and other parties sent a letter to Trump asking him to withdraw from the Paris agreement. [27] On May 25, 2017, 22 Republican senators, including Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, sent a two-page letter to Trump asking him to withdraw the United States from the Paris Agreement. [29] This letter was written by Senator John Barrasso, Chairman of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee, and Senator Jim Inhofe, known for his many years of climate change denial. [30] Most of the signatories to the letter were elected by states that depended on the burning of fossil fuels (coal, oil and gas); [29] The group of 22 senators had received more than $10 million in election contributions from fossil fuel companies over the past three election cycles. [30] Earlier this week, a group of 40 Democratic senators sent a letter to Trump asking him to keep America in the Paris agreement, writing that “a withdrawal from America would damage credibility and influence on the world stage.” [29] As the Wall Street Journal wrote this morning: “The reality is that withdrawal is in America`s economic interest and will not play a big role in the climate.” The United States will remain the cleanest and most environmentally friendly country in the world under the Trump administration.