Terms Of Paris Climate Agreement

In an effort to “significantly reduce the risks and effects of climate change,” the agreement calls for the average increase in global temperature over this century to be well below 2 degrees Celsius, while continuing efforts to limit temperature rise to 1.5 degrees. It also calls on countries to commit as quickly as possible to comparing global greenhouse gas emissions and to become carbon neutral by the second half of this century. To achieve these goals, 186 countries – responsible for more than 90% of global emissions – presented CO2 reduction targets prior to the Paris conference, known as “determined national contributions” (INDC). These targets set out the commitments made by each country to reduce emissions until 2025 or 2030, including macroeconomic targets for co2 reduction and individual commitments of some 2,250 cities and 2,025 companies. In order to promote the integrated approach it implements, France continues to work to maintain the momentum created by COP21. She was therefore an active participant in COP23 held in Bonn, Germany, in November 2017. States met to work on the formulation of the rules for implementing the Paris Agreement and to discuss the ambition of national climate commitments. In 2013, at COP 19 in Warsaw, the parties were invited to make their “nationally planned contributions” (INDC) to the Paris Agreement in due course prior to COP 21. These bids represent the mitigation targets set by each country for the period from 2020. The final CNN was submitted by each party after their formal ratification or adoption of the agreement and recorded in a UNFCCC registry. To date, 186 parties have submitted their first NCCs. It is an agreement with an “action agenda” to implement accelerators to ensure more ambitious progress beyond binding commitments.

InDCs become CNDs – nationally determined contributions – as soon as a country formally adheres to the agreement. There are no specific requirements as to how or how many countries should reduce emissions, but there were political expectations about the nature and rigour of the targets set by different countries. As a result, the scale and ambition of national plans vary widely, largely reflecting each country`s capacity, level of development and contribution to emissions over time. China, for example, has committed to cleaning up its CO2 emissions by 2030 at the latest and reducing CO2 emissions per unit of gross domestic product (GDP) by 60-65% by 2030 from 2005 levels. India has set a target of reducing emissions intensity by 33-35% from 2005 levels by 2030 and producing 40% of its electricity from non-fossil fuels.